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intrikate88:

shardsofblu:

agentrromanoff:

favorite action sequences
↳ captain america: the winter soldier - nick fury is attacked

Look at this. JUST LOOK AT HOW FUCKING BADASS THIS IS.

But you still truly fear for him, because this shit happens right in the middle of a city in broad daylight, where they’re gonna riddle him with bullets and tear him into pieces. And how most people would then regard him simply as a common criminal rightfully pursued by the police, who deserved the very public execution he’s about to get.

There’s a lot to be said about how they chose the “police” machinery to take down Fury, while Steve and company was pursued by nondescript Hydra thugs and the presumably private STRIKE team. They would have absolutely no problem to murder Fury then and there, but with Steve they know they simply cannot do it when there are witnesses around.

Not here, they say for Steve Rogers. But right here and right now for Nick Fury.

And also? Before the attack, Fury sees the white cops eyeballing him in his nice SUV and says “you wanna see my lease?” This man has decades of experience in intelligence operations. He’s been lead developer on an international security-based predictive analysis program. He’s an operations mastermind. 

AND NICK FURY DOESN’T SEE THIS ATTACK COMING BECAUSE THE WARNING SIGNS LOOK EXACTLY LIKE THE AVERAGE INSTITUTIONAL RACISM HE SEES ON A REGULAR BASIS. 

brianmichaelbendis:

Peter’s Advice
SPIDER-MEN #5 (Nov. 2012)
Art by Sara Pichelli & Justin Ponsor
Words by Brian Michael Bendis

dinocelacanto:

“Whether we like it or not, race is an enduring principle of classification and organization within academe, relegating some people to outsides within. Putting colored people in their place through racially marked circumscription, often layered with meetings related to gender and class, may be subtle, but it is, nonetheless, real. In order to negotiate,resist, and adjust to its most humiliating and hurtful forms, racially marked intellectuals often find themselves deploying energy that might otherwise be invested in furthering their scholarship”

-Faye Harrison, Harrison, Faye (2008) Outsider Within: Reworking Anthropology in the Global Age.

My Least Favorite Trope (and this post will include spoilers for The Lego Movie, Guardians of the Galaxy, The Matrix, Western Civilization, and—cod help me—Bulletproof Monk*.) is the thing where there’s an awesome, smart, wonderful, powerful female character who by all rights ought to be the Chosen One and the hero of the movie, who is tasked with taking care of some generally ineffectual male character who is, for reasons of wish fulfillment, actually the person the film focuses on. She mentors him, she teaches him, and she inevitably becomes his girlfriend… and he gets the job she wanted: he gets to be the Chosen One even though she’s obviously far more qualified. And all he has to do to get it and deserve it is Man Up and Take Responsibility.

And that’s it. Every god-damned time. The mere fact of naming the films above and naming the trope gives away the entire plot and character arc of every single movie.

Elizabeth Bear - My Least Favorite Trope (via feministquotes)

This. So much this. I cannot stand these movies anymore, I’m so fucking done with this trope. 

(via astolat)

bloodhole:

did you know that the main reason we have a school lunch program is that in 1946 kids were too underfed to qualify for military service bc i just found that out and am horrified

nobody cares about children’s wellbeing without an ulterior motive

comicsalliance:

THE NAUGHTY KNOT: UNPACKING MARVEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AXEL ALONSO’S COMMENTS ON SEX APPEAL AND DIVERSITY
By Andrew Wheeler
In an interview with The Telegraph’s Radhika Sanghani, Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso offered some insights into how he regards the superhero comic industry’s treatment of female characters — and his own intentions towards diversity.
The interview is chiefly noteworthy for confirming what already seems apparent from recent changes in Marvel’s line-up, namely that Marvel understands and is responding to demographic changes in the marketplace. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this [product] and we want to make sure they get it,” said Alonso. “This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”
Capitalism is not the starry-eyed spark for change that many of us might wish for, but realistically it’s usually the most effective. Comics is a business — and a very risk-averse business at that. Despite being relatively agile among entertainment media, with quick turnarounds and minimal personnel, superhero comics tend to follow change rather than trying to lead it.
The good news is that Marvel sees a profit motive and is not averse to it. The conservative instincts of superhero publishers — with their attentions fixed on known brands and past glories — can easily lead to a reflexive rejection of anything that feels unfamiliar, such as the paradigm-spinning notion that women are people and not set dressing. It’s sad to say it, but it actually feels like a win just to have evidence that the industry isn’t sliding backwards.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

THE NAUGHTY KNOT: UNPACKING MARVEL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF AXEL ALONSO’S COMMENTS ON SEX APPEAL AND DIVERSITY

By Andrew Wheeler

In an interview with The Telegraph’s Radhika Sanghani, Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso offered some insights into how he regards the superhero comic industry’s treatment of female characters — and his own intentions towards diversity.

The interview is chiefly noteworthy for confirming what already seems apparent from recent changes in Marvel’s line-up, namely that Marvel understands and is responding to demographic changes in the marketplace. “We believe there’s an audience of women out there who are hungry for this [product] and we want to make sure they get it,” said Alonso. “This is affirmative action. This is capitalism.”

Capitalism is not the starry-eyed spark for change that many of us might wish for, but realistically it’s usually the most effective. Comics is a business — and a very risk-averse business at that. Despite being relatively agile among entertainment media, with quick turnarounds and minimal personnel, superhero comics tend to follow change rather than trying to lead it.

The good news is that Marvel sees a profit motive and is not averse to it. The conservative instincts of superhero publishers — with their attentions fixed on known brands and past glories — can easily lead to a reflexive rejection of anything that feels unfamiliar, such as the paradigm-spinning notion that women are people and not set dressing. It’s sad to say it, but it actually feels like a win just to have evidence that the industry isn’t sliding backwards.

READ MORE

gaycrime:

wow The Onion is dropping a lot of truth for a work of satire

gaycrime:

wow The Onion is dropping a lot of truth for a work of satire

marcys-mareep:

adventure time literally explaining colonialism in 30 seconds